Los Angeles County West Vector & Vector-Borne Disease Control District

 

About Mosquitoes

 

 Mosquitoes are insects in the order of Diptera, family Culicidae

 There are 3,500 species of mosquitoes in the world, over 50 are here in California

  Only a handful of species found locally are capable of transmitting diseases to humans

  Mosquitoes need standing water to lay their eggs

 

Mosquitoes in Los Angeles County West Vector & Vector-Borne Disease Control District

Mosquito Species

Common Name

Breeding Habitat

Public Health Importance*

Culex tarsalis

Western Encephalitis Mosquito

Agricultural, natural, or man-made sources

Primary vector of WNV, SLE and WEE

Culex quinquefasciatus

Southern House Mosquito

Foul or polluted water (natural and man-made sources)

WNV, SLE, and WEE vector

Culex erythrothorax

Tule or Cattail Mosquito

Marshes, lakes, ponds with tules and cattails

WNV vector (feeds mainly on birds)

Culex stigmatosoma

Banded Foul-water Mosquito

Foul or polluted water (natural and man-made sources)

May act as enzootic amplifiers of SLE and WNV in nature

Culiseta incidens

Cool-weather Mosquito

Shaded clear water (natural and man-made sources)

Not known to transmit disease in CA

Culiseta inornata 

Large Winter Mosquito

Sunlit or shaded sources

Not known to transmit disease in CA

Aedes albopictus

Asian tiger mosquito

Containers (vases, flower saucers, tires) and plants (lucky bamboo plants, bromeliads)

Zika virus, dengue fever, yellow fever, and chikungunya vector

Aedes aegypti

Yellow fever mosquito

Indoor/outdoor containers (vases, flower saucers, tires) and plants (lucky bamboo plants, bromeliads)

Zika virus, dengue fever, yellow fever, and chikungunya  vector

Aedes notoscriptus

Australian backyard mosquito

Natural and man-made containers

Canine heartworm vector

* WNV: West Nile virus

  SLE: St. Louis encephalitis
  WEE: Western Equine encephalomyelitis

 

Mosquito Life Cycle

 Mosquitoes can go from egg to adult in 7 days

 Breeding habitats range from stagnant, polluted water to bright, sunlit bodies of water, to small containers such as indoor/outdoor vases and containers

Eggs

Laid in clusters called rafts, which float on the surface of standing water

 

 

Invasive Aedes species lay eggs individually or at the water line of natural and artificial containers. Eggs hatch within days after contact with water.

Larvae

Develop in standing water
Feed on organic matter

 

 

Pupae

Resting stage
Does not feed

 

Adults

Rest on the surface until strong enough to fly, mate and feed
Only the females bite to obtain blood

 

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